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Getting Started

This tutorial is a step-by-step introduction to installing Icinga 2 and Icinga Web 2. It assumes that you are familiar with the operating system you’re using to install Icinga 2.

In case you are upgrading an existing setup, please ensure to follow the upgrade documentation.

Setting up Icinga 2

First off you have to install Icinga 2. The preferred way of doing this is to use the official package repositories depending on which operating system and distribution you are running.

Distribution Repository
Debian Icinga Repository
Ubuntu Icinga Repository
RHEL/CentOS Icinga Repository
openSUSE Icinga Repository
SLES Icinga Repository
Gentoo Upstream
FreeBSD Upstream
OpenBSD Upstream
ArchLinux Upstream
Alpine Linux Upstream

Packages for distributions other than the ones listed above may also be available. Please contact your distribution packagers.

Package Repositories

You need to add the Icinga repository to your package management configuration. The following commands must be executed with root permissions unless noted otherwise.

Debian:

apt-get -y install apt-transport-https

wget -O - https://packages.icinga.com/icinga.key | apt-key add -
echo 'deb https://packages.icinga.com/debian icinga-stretch main' >/etc/apt/sources.list.d/icinga.list
apt-get update

Ubuntu:

apt-get -y install apt-transport-https

wget -O - https://packages.icinga.com/icinga.key | apt-key add -
echo 'deb https://packages.icinga.com/ubuntu icinga-xenial main' >/etc/apt/sources.list.d/icinga.list
apt-get update

RHEL/CentOS 7:

yum install https://packages.icinga.com/epel/icinga-rpm-release-7-latest.noarch.rpm

RHEL/CentOS 6:

yum install https://packages.icinga.com/epel/icinga-rpm-release-6-latest.noarch.rpm

Fedora 27:

dnf install https://packages.icinga.com/fedora/icinga-rpm-release-27-latest.noarch.rpm

Fedora 26:

dnf install https://packages.icinga.com/fedora/icinga-rpm-release-26-latest.noarch.rpm

SLES 12:

zypper ar https://packages.icinga.com/SUSE/ICINGA-release.repo
zypper ref

SLES 11:

zypper ar https://packages.icinga.com/SUSE/ICINGA-release-11.repo
zypper ref

openSUSE:

zypper ar https://packages.icinga.com/openSUSE/ICINGA-release.repo
zypper ref

Alpine Linux:

echo "http://dl-cdn.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/community" >> /etc/apk/repositories
apk update

RHEL/CentOS EPEL Repository

The packages for RHEL/CentOS depend on other packages which are distributed as part of the EPEL repository.

CentOS 7/6:

yum install epel-release

If you are using RHEL you need to enable the optional repository and then install the EPEL rpm package.

subscription-manager repos --enable rhel-7-server-optional-rpms
# or
subscription-manager repos --enable rhel-6-server-optional-rpms

SLES Security Repository

The packages for SLES 11 depend on the openssl1 package which is distributed as part of the SLES 11 Security Module.

SLES 12 SDK

Icinga 2 requires the libboost_chrono1_54_0 package from the SLES 12 SDK repository. Refer to the SUSE Enterprise Linux documentation for further information.

Alpine Linux Notes

The example provided assumes that you are running Alpine edge, which is the -dev branch and is a rolling release. If you are using a stable version please “pin” the edge repository on the latest Icinga 2 package version. In order to correctly manage your repository, please follow these instructions

Installing Icinga 2

You can install Icinga 2 by using your distribution’s package manager to install the icinga2 package. The following commands must be executed with root permissions unless noted otherwise.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install icinga2

RHEL/CentOS 6:

yum install icinga2
chkconfig icinga2 on
service icinga2 start

RHEL/CentOS 7 and Fedora:

yum install icinga2
systemctl enable icinga2
systemctl start icinga2

SLES/openSUSE:

zypper install icinga2

FreeBSD:

pkg install icinga2

Alpine Linux:

apk add icinga2

Enabled Features during Installation

The default installation will enable three features required for a basic Icinga 2 installation:

  • checker for executing checks
  • notification for sending notifications
  • mainlog for writing the icinga2.log file

You can verify that by calling icinga2 feature list CLI command to see which features are enabled and disabled.

# icinga2 feature list
Disabled features: api command compatlog debuglog gelf graphite icingastatus ido-mysql ido-pgsql influxdb livestatus opentsdb perfdata statusdata syslog
Enabled features: checker mainlog notification

Installation Paths

By default Icinga 2 uses the following files and directories:

Path Description
/etc/icinga2 Contains Icinga 2 configuration files.
/usr/lib/systemd/system/icinga2.service The Icinga 2 Systemd service file on systems using Systemd.
/etc/systemd/system/icinga2.service.d/limits.conf On distributions with Systemd >227, additional service limits are required.
/etc/init.d/icinga2 The Icinga 2 init script on systems using SysVinit or OpenRC.
/usr/sbin/icinga2 Shell wrapper for the Icinga 2 binary.
/usr/lib*/icinga2 Libraries and the Icinga 2 binary (use find /usr -type f -name icinga2 to locate the binary path).
/usr/share/doc/icinga2 Documentation files that come with Icinga 2.
/usr/share/icinga2/include The Icinga Template Library and plugin command configuration.
/var/lib/icinga2 Icinga 2 state file, cluster log, master CA, node certificates and configuration files (cluster, api).
/var/run/icinga2 PID file.
/var/run/icinga2/cmd Command pipe and Livestatus socket.
/var/cache/icinga2 status.dat/objects.cache, icinga2.debug files.
/var/spool/icinga2 Used for performance data spool files.
/var/log/icinga2 Log file location and compat/ directory for the CompatLogger feature.

FreeBSD uses slightly different paths:

By default Icinga 2 uses the following files and directories:

Path Description
/usr/local/etc/icinga2 Contains Icinga 2 configuration files.
/usr/local/etc/rc.d/icinga2 The Icinga 2 init script.
/usr/local/sbin/icinga2 Shell wrapper for the Icinga 2 binary.
/usr/local/lib/icinga2 Libraries and the Icinga 2 binary.
/usr/local/share/doc/icinga2 Documentation files that come with Icinga 2.
/usr/local/share/icinga2/include The Icinga Template Library and plugin command configuration.
/var/lib/icinga2 Icinga 2 state file, cluster log, master CA, node certificates and configuration files (cluster, api).
/var/run/icinga2 PID file.
/var/run/icinga2/cmd Command pipe and Livestatus socket.
/var/cache/icinga2 status.dat/objects.cache, icinga2.debug files.
/var/spool/icinga2 Used for performance data spool files.
/var/log/icinga2 Log file location and compat/ directory for the CompatLogger feature.

Setting up Check Plugins

Without plugins Icinga 2 does not know how to check external services. The Monitoring Plugins Project provides an extensive set of plugins which can be used with Icinga 2 to check whether services are working properly.

These plugins are required to make the example configuration work out-of-the-box.

For your convenience here is a list of package names for some of the more popular operating systems/distributions:

OS/Distribution Package Name Repository Installation Path
RHEL/CentOS nagios-plugins-all EPEL /usr/lib/nagios/plugins or /usr/lib64/nagios/plugins
SLES/OpenSUSE monitoring-plugins server:monitoring /usr/lib/nagios/plugins
Debian/Ubuntu monitoring-plugins - /usr/lib/nagios/plugins
FreeBSD monitoring-plugins - /usr/local/libexec/nagios
Alpine Linux monitoring-plugins - /usr/lib/monitoring-plugins
OS X nagios-plugins MacPorts, Homebrew /opt/local/libexec or /usr/local/sbin

The recommended way of installing these standard plugins is to use your distribution’s package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install monitoring-plugins

RHEL/CentOS:

yum install nagios-plugins-all

The packages for RHEL/CentOS depend on other packages which are distributed as part of the EPEL repository. Please make sure to enable this repository by following these instructions.

Fedora:

dnf install nagios-plugins-all

SLES/openSUSE:

zypper install monitoring-plugins

The packages for SLES/OpenSUSE depend on other packages which are distributed as part of the server:monitoring repository. Please make sure to enable this repository beforehand.

FreeBSD:

pkg install monitoring-plugins

Alpine Linux:

apk add monitoring-plugins

Note: For Alpine you don’t need to explicitly add the monitoring-plugins package since it is a dependency of icinga2 and is pulled automatically.

Depending on which directory your plugins are installed into you may need to update the global PluginDir constant in your Icinga 2 configuration. This constant is used by the check command definitions contained in the Icinga Template Library to determine where to find the plugin binaries.

Note

Please refer to the service monitoring chapter for details about how to integrate additional check plugins into your Icinga 2 setup.

Running Icinga 2

Systemd Service

Some distributions (e.g. Fedora, openSUSE and RHEL/CentOS 7) use Systemd. The Icinga 2 packages automatically install the necessary Systemd unit files.

The Icinga 2 Systemd service can be (re-)started, reloaded, stopped and also queried for its current status.

# systemctl status icinga2
icinga2.service - Icinga host/service/network monitoring system
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/icinga2.service; disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Mi 2014-07-23 13:39:38 CEST; 15s ago
  Process: 21692 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/icinga2 -c ${ICINGA2_CONFIG_FILE} -d -e ${ICINGA2_ERROR_LOG} -u ${ICINGA2_USER} -g ${ICINGA2_GROUP} (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
  Process: 21674 ExecStartPre=/usr/sbin/icinga2-prepare-dirs /etc/sysconfig/icinga2 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 21727 (icinga2)
   CGroup: /system.slice/icinga2.service
           21727 /usr/sbin/icinga2 -c /etc/icinga2/icinga2.conf -d -e /var/log/icinga2/error.log -u icinga -g icinga --no-stack-rlimit

Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 309 Service(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 1 User(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 15 Notification(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 4 ScheduledDowntime(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 1 UserGroup(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 1 IcingaApplication(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif icinga2[21692]: [2014-07-23 13:39:38 +0200] information/ConfigItem: Checked 8 Dependency(s).
Jul 23 13:39:38 nbmif systemd[1]: Started Icinga host/service/network monitoring system.

The systemctl command supports the following actions:

Command Description
start The start action starts the Icinga 2 daemon.
stop The stop action stops the Icinga 2 daemon.
restart The restart action is a shortcut for running the stop action followed by start.
reload The reload action sends the HUP signal to Icinga 2 which causes it to restart. Unlike the restart action reload does not wait until Icinga 2 has restarted.
status The status action checks if Icinga 2 is running.
enable The enable action enables the service being started at system boot time (similar to chkconfig)

Examples:

# systemctl enable icinga2

# systemctl restart icinga2
Job for icinga2.service failed. See 'systemctl status icinga2.service' and 'journalctl -xn' for details.

If you’re stuck with configuration errors, you can manually invoke the configuration validation.

Tip

If you are running into fork errors with Systemd enabled distributions, please check the troubleshooting chapter.

Init Script

Icinga 2’s init script is installed in /etc/init.d/icinga2 (/usr/local/etc/rc.d/icinga2 on FreeBSD) by default:

# /etc/init.d/icinga2
Usage: /etc/init.d/icinga2 {start|stop|restart|reload|checkconfig|status}

The init script supports the following actions:

Command Description
start The start action starts the Icinga 2 daemon.
stop The stop action stops the Icinga 2 daemon.
restart The restart action is a shortcut for running the stop action followed by start.
reload The reload action sends the HUP signal to Icinga 2 which causes it to restart. Unlike the restart action reload does not wait until Icinga 2 has restarted.
checkconfig The checkconfig action checks if the /etc/icinga2/icinga2.conf configuration file contains any errors.
status The status action checks if Icinga 2 is running.

By default, the Icinga 2 daemon is running as icinga user and group using the init script. Using Debian packages the user and group are set to nagios for historical reasons.

FreeBSD

On FreeBSD you need to enable icinga2 in your rc.conf

# sysrc icinga2_enable=yes

# service icinga2 restart

SELinux

SELinux is a mandatory access control (MAC) system on Linux which adds a fine-grained permission system for access to all system resources such as files, devices, networks and inter-process communication.

Icinga 2 provides its own SELinux policy. icinga2-selinux is a policy package for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and derivatives. The package runs the targeted policy which confines Icinga 2 including enabled features and running commands.

RHEL/CentOS 7:

yum install icinga2-selinux

Fedora:

dnf install icinga2-selinux

Read more about SELinux in this chapter.

Configuration Syntax Highlighting

Icinga 2 provides configuration examples for syntax highlighting using the vim and nano editors. The RHEL and SUSE package icinga2-common installs these files into /usr/share/doc/icinga2-common-[x.x.x]/syntax (where [x.x.x] is the version number, e.g. 2.4.3 or 2.4.4). Sources provide these files in tools/syntax. On Debian systems the icinga2-common package provides only the Nano configuration file (/usr/share/nano/icinga2.nanorc); to obtain the Vim configuration, please install the extra package vim-icinga2. The files are located in /usr/share/vim/addons.

Configuration Syntax Highlighting using Vim

Install the package vim-icinga2 with your distribution’s package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install vim-icinga2 vim-addon-manager
vim-addon-manager -w install icinga2
Info: installing removed addon 'icinga2' to /var/lib/vim/addons

RHEL/CentOS/Fedora:

yum install vim-icinga2

SLES/openSUSE:

zypper install vim-icinga2

Alpine Linux:

apk add icinga2-vim

Ensure that syntax highlighting is enabled e.g. by editing the user’s vimrc configuration file:

# vim ~/.vimrc
syntax on

Test it:

# vim /etc/icinga2/conf.d/templates.conf

Vim with syntax highlighting

Configuration Syntax Highlighting using Nano

Install the package nano-icinga2 with your distribution’s package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu:

Note: The syntax files are installed with the icinga2-common package already.

RHEL/CentOS/Fedora:

yum install nano-icinga2

SLES/openSUSE:

zypper install nano-icinga2

Copy the /etc/nanorc sample file to your home directory.

$ cp /etc/nanorc ~/.nanorc

Include the icinga2.nanorc file.

$ vim ~/.nanorc

## Icinga 2
include "/usr/share/nano/icinga2.nanorc"

Test it:

$ nano /etc/icinga2/conf.d/templates.conf

Nano with syntax highlighting

Setting up Icinga Web 2

Icinga 2 can be used with Icinga Web 2 and a variety of modules. This chapter explains how to set up Icinga Web 2.

The DB IDO (Database Icinga Data Output) feature for Icinga 2 take care of exporting all configuration and status information into a database.

Please choose whether to install MySQL or PostgreSQL.

Configuring DB IDO MySQL

Installing MySQL database server

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install mysql-server mysql-client

mysql_secure_installation

RHEL/CentOS 7 and Fedora:

yum install mariadb-server mariadb
systemctl enable mariadb
systemctl start mariadb
mysql_secure_installation

RHEL/CentOS 6:

yum install mysql-server mysql
chkconfig mysqld on
service mysqld start

mysql_secure_installation

SUSE:

zypper install mysql mysql-client
chkconfig mysqld on
service mysqld start

FreeBSD:

pkg install mysql56-server
sysrc mysql_enable=yes
service mysql-server restart
mysql_secure_installation

Alpine Linux:

apk add mariadb
rc-service mariadb setup
rc-update add mariadb default
rc-service mariadb start

Installing the IDO modules for MySQL

The next step is to install the icinga2-ido-mysql package using your distribution’s package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install icinga2-ido-mysql

RHEL/CentOS:

yum install icinga2-ido-mysql

SUSE:

zypper install icinga2-ido-mysql

FreeBSD:

On FreeBSD the IDO modules for MySQL are included with the icinga2 package and located at /usr/local/share/icinga2-ido-mysql/schema/mysql.sql.

Alpine Linux:

On Alpine Linux the IDO modules for MySQL are included with the icinga2 package and located at /usr/share/icinga2-ido-mysql/schema/mysql.sql.

Note

The Debian/Ubuntu packages provide a database configuration wizard by default. You can skip the automated setup and install/upgrade the database manually if you prefer.

Setting up the MySQL database

Set up a MySQL database for Icinga 2:

# mysql -u root -p

CREATE DATABASE icinga;
GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, DROP, CREATE VIEW, INDEX, EXECUTE ON icinga.* TO 'icinga'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'icinga';
quit

setting up the database on CentOS 7

After creating the database you can import the Icinga 2 IDO schema using the following command. Enter the root password into the prompt when asked.

mysql -u root -p icinga < /usr/share/icinga2-ido-mysql/schema/mysql.sql

Enabling the IDO MySQL module

The package provides a new configuration file that is installed in /etc/icinga2/features-available/ido-mysql.conf. You can update the database credentials in this file.

All available attributes are explained in the IdoMysqlConnection object chapter.

You can enable the ido-mysql feature configuration file using icinga2 feature enable:

# icinga2 feature enable ido-mysql
Module 'ido-mysql' was enabled.
Make sure to restart Icinga 2 for these changes to take effect.

Restart Icinga 2.

systemctl restart icinga2

Alpine Linux:

rc-service icinga2 restart

Continue with the webserver setup.

Configuring DB IDO PostgreSQL

Installing PostgreSQL database server

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install postgresql

RHEL/CentOS 6:

yum install postgresql-server postgresql
chkconfig postgresql on
service postgresql initdb
service postgresql start

RHEL/CentOS 7:

yum install postgresql-server postgresql
postgresql-setup initdb
systemctl enable postgresql
systemctl start postgresql

SUSE:

zypper install postgresql postgresql-server
chkconfig postgresql on
service postgresql initdb
service postgresql start

FreeBSD:

pkg install postgresql93-server
sysrc postgresql_enable=yes
service postgresql initdb
service postgresql start

Alpine Linux:

apk add postgresql
rc-update add postgresql default
rc-service postgresql setup
rc-service postgresql start

Installing the IDO modules for PostgreSQL

The next step is to install the icinga2-ido-pgsql package using your distribution’s package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install icinga2-ido-pgsql

RHEL/CentOS:

yum install icinga2-ido-pgsql

SUSE:

zypper install icinga2-ido-pgsql

FreeBSD:

On FreeBSD the IDO modules for PostgreSQL are included with the icinga2 package and located at /usr/local/share/icinga2-ido-pgsql/schema/pgsql.sql.

Alpine Linux:

On Alpine Linux the IDO modules for PostgreSQL are included with the icinga2 package and located at /usr/share/icinga2-ido-pgsql/schema/pgsql.sql.

Note

Upstream Debian packages provide a database configuration wizard by default. You can skip the automated setup and install/upgrade the database manually if you prefer that.

Setting up the PostgreSQL database

Set up a PostgreSQL database for Icinga 2:

cd /tmp
sudo -u postgres psql -c "CREATE ROLE icinga WITH LOGIN PASSWORD 'icinga'"
sudo -u postgres createdb -O icinga -E UTF8 icinga

Note

It is assumed here that your locale is set to utf-8, you may run into problems otherwise.

Locate your pg_hba.conf configuration file (Debian: /etc/postgresql/*/main/pg_hba.conf, RHEL/SUSE: /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf), add the icinga user with md5 as authentication method and restart the postgresql server.

# icinga
local   icinga      icinga                            md5
host    icinga      icinga      127.0.0.1/32          md5
host    icinga      icinga      ::1/128               md5

# "local" is for Unix domain socket connections only
local   all         all                               ident
# IPv4 local connections:
host    all         all         127.0.0.1/32          ident
# IPv6 local connections:
host    all         all         ::1/128               ident
systemctl restart postgresql

After creating the database and permissions you need to import the IDO database schema using the following command:

export PGPASSWORD=icinga
psql -U icinga -d icinga < /usr/share/icinga2-ido-pgsql/schema/pgsql.sql

importing the Icinga 2 IDO schema

Enabling the IDO PostgreSQL module

The package provides a new configuration file that is installed in /etc/icinga2/features-available/ido-pgsql.conf. You can update the database credentials in this file.

All available attributes are explained in the IdoPgsqlConnection object chapter.

You can enable the ido-pgsql feature configuration file using icinga2 feature enable:

# icinga2 feature enable ido-pgsql
Module 'ido-pgsql' was enabled.
Make sure to restart Icinga 2 for these changes to take effect.

Restart Icinga 2.

systemctl restart icinga2

Alpine Linux:

rc-service icinga2 restart

Continue with the webserver setup.

Webserver

The preferred way of installing Icinga Web 2 is to use Apache as webserver in combination with PHP-FPM. If you prefer Nginx, please refer to the Icinga Web 2 documentation.

Debian/Ubuntu:

apt-get install apache2

RHEL/CentOS 7, Fedora:

yum install httpd
systemctl enable httpd
systemctl start httpd

RHEL/CentOS 6:

yum install httpd
chkconfig httpd on
service httpd start

SUSE:

zypper install apache2
chkconfig on
service apache2 start

FreeBSD (Nginx, but you could also use the apache24 package):

pkg install nginx php56-gettext php56-ldap php56-openssl php56-mysql php56-pdo_mysql php56-pgsql php56-pdo_pgsql php56-sockets php56-gd pecl-imagick pecl-intl
sysrc php_fpm_enable=yes
sysrc nginx_enable=yes
sed -i '' "s/listen\ =\ 127.0.0.1:9000/listen\ =\ \/var\/run\/php5-fpm.sock/" /usr/local/etc/php-fpm.conf
sed -i '' "s/;listen.owner/listen.owner/" /usr/local/etc/php-fpm.conf
sed -i '' "s/;listen.group/listen.group/" /usr/local/etc/php-fpm.conf
sed -i '' "s/;listen.mode/listen.mode/" /usr/local/etc/php-fpm.conf
service php-fpm start
service nginx start

Alpine Linux:

apk add apache2 php7-apache2
sed -i -e "s/^#LoadModule rewrite_module/LoadModule rewrite_module/" /etc/apache2/httpd.conf
rc-update add apache2 default
rc-service apache2 start

Firewall Rules

Enable port 80 (http). Best practice is to only enable port 443 (https) and use TLS certificates.

firewall-cmd:

firewall-cmd --add-service=http
firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=http

iptables:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
service iptables save

FreeBSD: Please consult the FreeBSD Handbook how to configure one of FreeBSD’s firewalls.

Setting Up Icinga 2 REST API

Icinga Web 2 and other web interfaces require the REST API to send actions (reschedule check, etc.) and query object details.

You can run the CLI command icinga2 api setup to enable the api feature and set up certificates as well as a new API user root with an auto-generated password in the /etc/icinga2/conf.d/api-users.conf configuration file:

icinga2 api setup

Edit the api-users.conf file and add a new ApiUser object. Specify the permissions attribute with minimal permissions required by Icinga Web 2.

vim /etc/icinga2/conf.d/api-users.conf

object ApiUser "icingaweb2" {
  password = "Wijsn8Z9eRs5E25d"
  permissions = [ "status/query", "actions/*", "objects/modify/*", "objects/query/*" ]
}

Restart Icinga 2 to activate the configuration.

systemctl restart icinga2

Alpine Linux:

rc-service icinga2 restart

Installing Icinga Web 2

Please consult the installation documentation for further instructions on how to install Icinga Web 2.

The Icinga 2 API can be defined as command transport in Icinga Web 2 >= 2.4.

Addons

A number of additional features are available in the form of addons. A list of popular addons is available in the Addons and Plugins chapter.

Backup

Ensure to include the following in your backups:

  • Configuration files in /etc/icinga2
  • Certificate files in /var/lib/icinga2/ca (Master CA key pair) and /var/lib/icinga2/certs (node certificates)
  • Runtime files in /var/lib/icinga2
  • Optional: IDO database backup

Backup: Database

MySQL/MariaDB:

PostgreSQL: