8 years #icingalove

8 years ago, May 2009 all we knew – create a better monitoring tool and work with our community and their demands. Integrate long awaited patches and functionality and care about feedback. Community members from all around the globe joined that vision. Germany, Austria, Italy, UK, India, USA, Australia, Brazil, Belgium,… many of us never worked in an open source project, and we try to make things right. Passionate with lots of emotional discussions, still putting our ideas to the next level.

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Icinga Director featured in iX magazine 04/17

Image source: https://shop.heise.de/katalog/ix-04-2017-pdf

Marianne Spiller, our fellow community member @sys_adm_ama, told us last week during Icinga Camp Berlin that she was about to publish an article about the Icinga Director. Today the iX magazine 04/17 was published and page 62 features Marianne’s article.

I’ve got myself the ebook already. Templates, change history, import sources, more modules just like PuppetDB or AWS – everything you know and love about the Director gets covered. Pretty awesome overview of the Icinga Director in “only” 3 pages. Keep in mind that the article is in German, so you might need some extra translation ;-)

Congratulations Marianne & thanks for writing such a nice article. We’re hoping for more! :-)

 

 

Monthly Snap January: Releases and Updates

Releases

The new revamped Puppet module for Icinga 2 was officially released and uploaded to PuppetForge. We’ve also released the new shiny Icinga Director 1.3.0 followed by the beautiful Business Process module 2.0.0 for Icinga Web 2.

Icinga 2 v2.6.1 and Icinga Web 2 v2.4.1 fix bugs we’ve come across after releasing the initial major versions. There also was a release for Icinga Core and Web 1.14 fixing several bugs and security issues.

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Analyse Icinga 2 problems using the console & API

Lately we’ve been investigating on a problem with the check scheduler. This resulted in check results being late and wasn’t easy to tackle – whether it’ll be the check scheduler, cluster messages or anything else. We’ve been analysing customer partner environments quite in deep and learned a lot ourselves which we like to share with you here.

One thing you can normally do is to grep the debug log and analyse the problem in deep. It is also possible to query the Icinga 2 API fetching interesting object attributes such as “last_check”, “next_check” or even “last_check_result”.

But what if you want to calculate things for better analysis e.g. fetch the number of all services in a HA cluster node where the check results are late? (more…)

Watch out – and shop!

Most of us use Icinga 2 to monitor network services, host resources or server components – but wait, there is more! Why not ask Icinga 2 to watch items in your favourite online shop and send out notifications as soon as the price has dropped below a certain amount? Antony Stone has written a slightly unusual check to track the price of Amazon items with Icinga 2. (more…)

Icinga 2: Host state calculation from all services

There is a variety of questions answered in the community support channels. Sometimes we just hack away fancy solutions directly inside the Icinga 2 DSL. Some of these examples are collected inside the documentation, others are posted on the community channels. Or they are just provided in hands-on workshops at customers waiting for sharing their stories to the world :)

This time there was the this question over at monitoring-portal.org – a host object collects a bunch of passive services and should calculate its overall state and output from the (worst) state of all referenced services.

Sounds easy. You could go for business process check returning the calculated value. Or you stick with many of the Icinga 2 configuration language features and put them altogether.

For a small test environment, I’ve generated 5 services using the random check (replace that with your real world scenario).

 

for (j in range(5)) {
  object Service "host-servicestatus-" + j {
    check_command = "random"
    check_interval = 30s
    retry_interval = 15s
    host_name = "host-servicestatus"
  }
}

The host object called “host-servicestatus” just uses the “dummy” check command provided by the ITL. This check command expects two custom attributes: “dummy_state” and “dummy_text”.

Now for the fun part – implement two lambda functions for these custom attributes using the available methods.

  vars.dummy_state = {{ ... }}
  vars.dummy_text = {{ ... }}

We want to calculate the worst state for all services on this specific host. Therefore we’ll use a temporary variable to save and update the worst state.

    var worst_state = 0

At first glance we want to selectively iterate over all service objects using the object accessor method “get_objects” with “Service” type. Then we’ll compare the service “host_name” attribute to the local scope (our host and its name). We’ll just skip all services not matching.

    for (s in get_objects(Service)) {
      if (s.host_name != host.name) {
        continue; //skip all services not referencing this host object
      }

The local to the loop variable “s” provides us with access to the all attributes for the current service object. Check whether its state is greater than 0 (not OK) and greater than the previously collected worst state. If so, store it in the local variable “worst_state”.

      if (s.state > 0 && s.state > worst_state) {
        worst_state = s.state
      }
    }

After the loop is finished, just return the “worst_state” variable for this function.

    return worst_state

In terms of generating an additional output text with all service names and their state, we’re using the same loop and conditional checking as above. Except we are using a temporary variable as an array of strings like this:

    var output = []

Inside the loop we’ll add the current service name and its state as string element to the “output” array.

      output.add(s.name + ": " + s.state)

Once the loop is finished, join the array elements with the separator “, ” concatenate the final output string and return it.

    return "Service summary: " + output.join(", ")

We could also concatenate the string as is but then we would need to think about the last loop run not adding the “,” character. The array join method just simplifies that step.

icinga2_host_servicestatus_web2The final solution works like a charm :-) If you say – hey I am not a coder – it helps to know Javascript, or Python or something similar of course. After all it is a pretty neat solution for helping a community member :)

 

object Host "host-servicestatus" {
  check_command = "dummy"

  vars.dummy_state = {{
    var worst_state = 0
    for (s in get_objects(Service)) {
      if (s.host_name != host.name) {
        continue; //skip all services not referencing this host object
      }

      if (s.state > 0 && s.state > worst_state) {
        worst_state = s.state
      }
    }

    return worst_state
  }}

  vars.dummy_text = {{
    var output = []

    for (s in get_objects(Service)) {
      if (s.host_name != host.name) {
        continue; //skip all services not referencing this host object
      }

      output.add(s.name + ": " + s.state)
    }

    return "Service summary: " + output.join(", ")
  }}
}